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In My Grandfather’s Words: Sunday and Monday, July 14, 15, 1918

Sunday

The weather was very hot through the afternoon and into the evening.

For breakfast I had two peaches, cornflakes, coffee, and bread. At lunch I enjoyed a spring chicken, spuds with gravy, ice cream, cake and cocoa. For supper we had a salad, water, and bread.

Up at 6:30 bathed and dressed in time for reveille at 6:45. After mess we were to have barracks inspections at 8:45. We were ordered to have all G.I. clothes out on bunks. It was supposed to be a checking inspection, too, but they did not check – just went through the barracks & looked them over.

Ralph had to feed today, so after noon mess I hiked over to the Cameron park. It is about two and a half miles from the remount east, past the base hospital. It is rather nice over there. There is a cool spring running water. That was the first natural cold drink I’ve had in Texas. I walked around over there quite a while then lay in the grass & read a while. I wrote part of a letter to Honey Girl. Continue reading In My Grandfather’s Words: Sunday and Monday, July 14, 15, 1918

My Grandfather’s Words: Thursday July 11, 1918

Weather: hot in A.M, but a north wind cooled the evening.

For breakfast we had coffee, oatmeal, canned milk, bread, fried spuds. Lunch was jam, bread, water, and beef soup. Supper was watermelon, cake, cold salad with one small tomato, water, bread and rice.

Up at 6 A.M. bathed and dressed at 6:15 with the usual routine, revielle all call, police up, and breakfast. Sergeant Hasht told me to go get a team this A.M. Choose a team and then report at the warehouse. I did and helped unload a car of bran and then helped unload a car of hay. We took it out to No. 7 corral. 80 bales. A pretty strenuous day in all. I was not as tired as I was last evening though. I think pushing that water cart is about as hard as any job on the cleaning and feeding force.

I am getting acclimated a little so I don’t feel the work on the cleaning force is as hard as it used to be any how. At first when they put me on the cleaning force, and I was shoveling manure, I did overdo it, especially in the heat. I now take it a little bit easier.

I just ate the tomato. I had eaten so much watermelon for supper I could not eat the tomato so I put it in my pocket. It’s now 8:30 and am eating it now.

I had my daily letter from Honey Girl today & I wrote her this evening. She will be getting a bit over the operation by now, God willing. It is over two days now & tho her throat will be sore for a while yet she will be getting used to it now.

My Grandfather’s Words: Wednesday July 10, 1918

The weather is hot and cloudy this evening.

For breakfast we all received three hotcakes, spuds, coffee, bread and one orange. For lunch we had spuds, roast pork with apple sauce, bread, pudding, and water. For dinner we had rice boiled with beef, bread, juice, and water.

I was up this A. M. at 6:00. I took a cold shower and dressed by 6:15. Reveille, policing up and breakfast over, has a little A.M. reading. The biography and essays of Benjamin Franklin. He was rather a wild one when young though industrious & frugal.

I had a letter from Honey Girl this noon. She did not have the operation on her throat until Tuesday. That was yesterday. I understand now why I felt so nervous yesterday and this A. M. My dear wife, if anything were to happened to her I would not want to live. She is the dearest in all the world to me.

We worked today in No. 8 & 9. I hoped to get finished & started on another one tomorrow. I think we are getting behind on the corral cleaning. We have been short of wagons & men & of course are not making much progress. Most of the outfit is unloading hay & storing it in the sheds. They are scraping out the old hay from the sheds and storing the new.

149151468_xsI ate the last of Mary’s 4th of July cake night before last. It was good. Last night & tonight I had a glass of mild at the restaurant. It is good. It is worth the nickel. Milk in town is 20 cents a quart & not at all plentiful for that price.

There has been times when I would pay a dollar for a quart of cold milk since I’ve been here.

My Grandfather’s Words: Saturday July 6, 1918

543-taken-at-camp-macarthur-waco-texas-durWeather: Hot as usual.

Breakfast: Grapenuts, milk, fried spuds, bread, coffee. For dinner (lunch) we had boiled ham, cabbage, spuds, bread, water. Supper was sliced ham, cabbage, boiled spuds, bread, pudding, peaches, water, raisin pie.

Usual routine, up at six bathed & dressed by 6:20. Revielle, breakfast, finished a letter to honey-girl, then to work at 7:20. Worked till 11:15, came in, found a package in my mailbox from sweetheart, no letters. Shaved before dinner, then to work again at one. Worked till four, then quit for the day. Had a bath, changed into my uniform & was ready for supper.

Went to see the canteen sergeant about a job as short order cook. Some of the boy’s said it paid $10.00 a month extra. Told the sergeant I could hold it down. He wanted to know where I had cooked before. I told him “to home”. I told him I had “batched a year on a farm.” He didn’t say much, said that he wanted a cook’s helper, that he was not sure about the extra pay. They had promised extra pay, but he was not sure about it yet. It was not a satisfactory visit.

Went to library. Drew out two books. American short stories & Life of Franklin to read.

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Mess call at six. Ate supper, washed out some clothes, then read awhile. Ralph E. and J. Bohi came along. They were going to the Y to weigh themselves. They urged me to go along. I went & was weighed at 155 1/2. I’m getting used to the grub and the climate. Back to barracks. Read awhile, then to bed about 10:40.

My Grandfather’s Words: Friday July 5, 1918

Weather: Hot. Fair.

Breakfast was meat loaf, bread, fried spuds, and juice. For dinner we had beans, tomatoes, water, bread, beef, and onions. For supper we had bread, water, and cornstarch pudding.

A usual day…up at 6, a cold shower & dressed by 6:30. Reveille & breakfast & work as usual. Two letters at noon. One from Mary Dear & one from Mother. Mary will have her tonsils taken out tomorrow at 1:10. I am worrying, more or less. Yet I know she is in God’s hand. He will take care of her. Mother & the boys are well. They expected to stay home on the 4th, but they may go to Marshall, she thought.

Ben never writes to me. I guess he does not care for my telling him of the Lord Jesus. I surely wish he were saved or that I could make him see his need of a Savior.

I don’t know much else to write tonight. Just finished a letter to Mary so will go to my bunk. 9:45 P.M.