In My Grandfather’s Words:

Weather is hot, but cooled as the evening drew near.

Breakfast: liver and onions, fried spuds, plums, and coffee.

Dinner: Fresh roast beef, mashed spuds with gravy, cabbage, bread and pudding

Supper: pork chops, peas, pie, and cocoa to drink.

Scan0012Up at 6:15 and had to hustle to get bathed and  dressed for reveille at 6:20. I made it. The usual morning routine. I pushed the water cart at breakfast. I found a letter from Mary Dear when I got in at noon. She is getting along so well. I am so glad. I can thank God that He cares for her and is bringing her back to health and strength again. My dear little wife. How I miss her down here.

I was detailed to the warehouse this afternoon. This is how it happened: I went to the office to see Sargent Knuthen about getting a transfer to the shop at one O’clock. Then I went out to No. 6 corral to work. I hadn’t been there long when Sargent Murphy came out hunting for Milligan to detail him to the warehouse. I told him Milligan was on the hay force. At least, that’s what I thought. Then Carlyle, the civilian boss, came up. He said the civilian laborers said Milligan was on the hay stack. The Sargent told him what he wanted him for. I spoke up and asked him to put me on. Carlyle told him he could recommend me more than any man in the corral. The Sargent thought a moment and then told me to report to the warehouse.

This evening there wasn’t much to do so I took it easy. I have written to Sweetheart tonight and will soon go to bed. I want to walk to town tomorrow evening to look for rooms for Mary Girl.

In My Grandfather’s Words: Sunday and Monday, July 14, 15, 1918

Sunday

The weather was very hot through the afternoon and into the evening.

For breakfast I had two peaches, cornflakes, coffee, and bread. At lunch I enjoyed a spring chicken, spuds with gravy, ice cream, cake and cocoa. For supper we had a salad, water, and bread.

Up at 6:30 bathed and dressed in time for reveille at 6:45. After mess we were to have barracks inspections at 8:45. We were ordered to have all G.I. clothes out on bunks. It was supposed to be a checking inspection, too, but they did not check – just went through the barracks & looked them over.

Ralph had to feed today, so after noon mess I hiked over to the Cameron park. It is about two and a half miles from the remount east, past the base hospital. It is rather nice over there. There is a cool spring running water. That was the first natural cold drink I’ve had in Texas. I walked around over there quite a while then lay in the grass & read a while. I wrote part of a letter to Honey Girl. Continue reading In My Grandfather’s Words: Sunday and Monday, July 14, 15, 1918

My Grandfather’s Words: Friday and Saturday, July 12, 13, 1918

Editors Note: I’m sorry I’ve been out of touch for a few weeks. I’ve posted two entries from my grandfather’s journal to make up for it.

Friday

Weather was hot both this A.M and this P.M. I thought with the dark clouds there would be rain, but it was a dust storm.

Breakfast was liver & onions, bread, fried spuds. Lunch was cold roast beef, sliced potatoes with gravy, bread, water, and applesauce. For supper we ate bread, water, potatoes, meat, and gravy. I bought two sticks of candy.

Up at 6:10. Bathed and dressed by 6:20 reveille. The usual A.M. routine. Some of the men were told off last night to help load horses this morning. They had to rise at 4:20. They loaded out 260 head. Don’t know where they went. The top Sargent went along. I was informed by on the the Vet Corps men some time ago that there were about 11,000 horses and cows here. Several have been sent out since, & I suppose that there are around 900 or 1,000 here now. One of the horses was killed this evening. The men were driving a bunch into the 9th corral. This one slipped and fell and broke a leg. They had to put it down.

I don’t know much other news to set down tonight. I had a letter from Mary Dear written on Tuesday just before she had the operation. I had another letter from James written the day after the operation. Honey had tried to start the second letter but was too weak, so James finished it for her. She was at O’Neils. James had taken her there from the doctor’s office. She was in as satisfactory a condition as could be hoped for at that time. My dear girl. God keep her & take care of her for Jesus’s sake. Amen.

Saturday

Weather: A warm light rain this A.M.

Breakfast was hot cakes with syrup, coffee, a banana & cornflakes. For lunch we had bread, beans, cocoa, & tapioca pudding. For supper we had bread, water, spagetti with mean and apple cobbler.

I was up at usual time, bathed and dressed as per my usual routine. Worked in A & B & 6th corral today. We quit about 4 P.M. I had a hair cut. After mess, Ralph & I went to town. Hiked in and bame back on the car. I was looking for a furnished rooms. I was trying to get the lay of this end of town. Had a letter from Honey Girl written the next A.M. after she had her operation. She sat up in bed & wrote & and was feeling fairly good but weak. Aunt Frances was going to fix her something to drink, some kind of broth. I expect that would strengthen her.scan0039camp-macarthur.preview

My Grandfather’s Words: Thursday July 11, 1918

Weather: hot in A.M, but a north wind cooled the evening.

For breakfast we had coffee, oatmeal, canned milk, bread, fried spuds. Lunch was jam, bread, water, and beef soup. Supper was watermelon, cake, cold salad with one small tomato, water, bread and rice.

Up at 6 A.M. bathed and dressed at 6:15 with the usual routine, revielle all call, police up, and breakfast. Sergeant Hasht told me to go get a team this A.M. Choose a team and then report at the warehouse. I did and helped unload a car of bran and then helped unload a car of hay. We took it out to No. 7 corral. 80 bales. A pretty strenuous day in all. I was not as tired as I was last evening though. I think pushing that water cart is about as hard as any job on the cleaning and feeding force.

I am getting acclimated a little so I don’t feel the work on the cleaning force is as hard as it used to be any how. At first when they put me on the cleaning force, and I was shoveling manure, I did overdo it, especially in the heat. I now take it a little bit easier.

I just ate the tomato. I had eaten so much watermelon for supper I could not eat the tomato so I put it in my pocket. It’s now 8:30 and am eating it now.

I had my daily letter from Honey Girl today & I wrote her this evening. She will be getting a bit over the operation by now, God willing. It is over two days now & tho her throat will be sore for a while yet she will be getting used to it now.

My Grandfather’s Words: Wednesday July 10, 1918

The weather is hot and cloudy this evening.

For breakfast we all received three hotcakes, spuds, coffee, bread and one orange. For lunch we had spuds, roast pork with apple sauce, bread, pudding, and water. For dinner we had rice boiled with beef, bread, juice, and water.

I was up this A. M. at 6:00. I took a cold shower and dressed by 6:15. Reveille, policing up and breakfast over, has a little A.M. reading. The biography and essays of Benjamin Franklin. He was rather a wild one when young though industrious & frugal.

I had a letter from Honey Girl this noon. She did not have the operation on her throat until Tuesday. That was yesterday. I understand now why I felt so nervous yesterday and this A. M. My dear wife, if anything were to happened to her I would not want to live. She is the dearest in all the world to me.

We worked today in No. 8 & 9. I hoped to get finished & started on another one tomorrow. I think we are getting behind on the corral cleaning. We have been short of wagons & men & of course are not making much progress. Most of the outfit is unloading hay & storing it in the sheds. They are scraping out the old hay from the sheds and storing the new.

149151468_xsI ate the last of Mary’s 4th of July cake night before last. It was good. Last night & tonight I had a glass of mild at the restaurant. It is good. It is worth the nickel. Milk in town is 20 cents a quart & not at all plentiful for that price.

There has been times when I would pay a dollar for a quart of cold milk since I’ve been here.

My Grandfather’s Words: Tuesday July 9, 1918

Weather today was cool in the A.M. yet hot in the P.M.

For breakfast we ate fried spuds, bacon, cornflakes, coffee, bread and jam. For lunch we ate string beans, mashed spuds, meat & spaghetti, and doughnuts for dessert. For supper we had meat cooked with hot sauce, spuds, bread, water, and pudding.

Up at 6:10 bathed and dressed by 6:20 reveille and police work, breakfast & to work in the corral, lunch & back till 3, then worked in until P.M. It was so much cooler this morning but the heat rose in the afternoon. It was pretty hot.

I didn’t hear from Mary today. She was to have had her tonsils out Sat at 1:30 & yesterday’s letter was written then. It must have went all right with her or else I would have had a wire. I wish I could have been there, but God willed otherwise & I can try to put more trust in Him. She will be pretty sick for a while, but God grand she is all right now. I had ought not to worry, but I do. I guess it is because she is my dear wife, all I hold dearest in the world is just her. My Mary.

Today, D. Hartman who came here when I did is to go to the hospital tomorrow. He has a touch of T.B. This dust in the remount would develop that in most anyone, I guess. He is from a rather strong creed – the Church of the Disciples & is from Detroit, Michigan. I have talked with him on scriptural things. I am afraid he is not saved.

My Grandfather’s Words: Monday July 8, 1918

Waco, TX

Weather: hot as usual

Breakfast was fried spuds and some sort of cheese and egg scrambled together, coffee & bread. Dinner (lunch) was a kind of meat cooked with peppers – very hot, sweet corn, bread & jam, & water. Supper was hash, pickles, bread, peanut butter, water, & chocolate pudding.

I had a letter from Mary dear this P.M. It was written Friday evening. She’d been out to George Herman’s picking berries Friday. Was expecting to have her tonsils taken out on Saturday at 1:30. She was going to get Aunt Francis to go with her to the doctor’s office. I have been very much worried about her the last few days. But if she was not getting along all O.K. I know they would have wired me.

waymark-gallery

I was up at first call this A.M. Had ten minutes to bath and dress. Had to go some and did, too. Right after reveille went to “policing streets,” a new thing for the new recruits. Orders are to “police” every morning hereafter.

Usual work this A. M. cleaning in the 5th corral and evening cleaning in alleys and lanes of all corrals. Off at 5:30. Bathed & got into my uniform by 5:50. Supper and retreat over, I read the Waco paper & then wrote to Mary. I am now in recreation room writing in this diary.

Mary sent me that Sears and Robuck. Co. check for 12.95. I endorsed it & sent it back to her. She will need it much more than I do. I have enough to last me till pay day.

It is 9:00 and bed time for me tonight.

My Grandfather’s Words: Sunday July 7, 1918

Weather hot & clear.

Breakfast was spuds, coffee, bread, cornflakes, and 1/2 cantelope. Dinner (lunch) was boiled beef, dressing, root beer, spuds, eggplant, jam & bread. Supper was lemonade, bread, a kind of cake, oranges & bananas mixed in a kind of sauce, and fried spuds.

Up this A.M. at 6:20. Reveille sounded before I had time to bathe. I took a cold shower right after reveille, got into my uniform, had breakfast, read my Bible a little, and then shaved before I got my G. I. clothing arranged for inspection. Afterward, I started a letter to Mary girl. I did not finish it before inspections. Inspections finished about 11:00. I finished my letter to dearest and enclosed 4 postcards of the Remount.

Ralph came to my bunk house to say that Stokes was ready to take our pictures. Mess call blew before we got to the picture taking tho. After mess, had six exposures made of Ralph & I in different places around the Remount.

digital-commonwealth
Digital-commonwealth picture of the Y.M.C.A

Then up to the Y for Bible class. Mr. Cook of the Y had insisted we come up there. We have been having a little class by our selves here in the Remount. We had our class at the Y and it was not so very satisfactory.

I was appointed to lead a class next Sunday Evening. I don’t feel able to handle this & am not sure it is where God would have me.

Somerville, Ralph, Rohi, Baxter & myself went from here to the class. I wrote a letter to E.G. Matthews & to mother after the class. I read a while & had to hustle back for mess at five. Mess over & am now out on the warehouse platform writing. I will read a while & write to Mary before I go to bed. Went to bed at 10.

My Grandfather’s Words: Saturday July 6, 1918

543-taken-at-camp-macarthur-waco-texas-durWeather: Hot as usual.

Breakfast: Grapenuts, milk, fried spuds, bread, coffee. For dinner (lunch) we had boiled ham, cabbage, spuds, bread, water. Supper was sliced ham, cabbage, boiled spuds, bread, pudding, peaches, water, raisin pie.

Usual routine, up at six bathed & dressed by 6:20. Revielle, breakfast, finished a letter to honey-girl, then to work at 7:20. Worked till 11:15, came in, found a package in my mailbox from sweetheart, no letters. Shaved before dinner, then to work again at one. Worked till four, then quit for the day. Had a bath, changed into my uniform & was ready for supper.

Went to see the canteen sergeant about a job as short order cook. Some of the boy’s said it paid $10.00 a month extra. Told the sergeant I could hold it down. He wanted to know where I had cooked before. I told him “to home”. I told him I had “batched a year on a farm.” He didn’t say much, said that he wanted a cook’s helper, that he was not sure about the extra pay. They had promised extra pay, but he was not sure about it yet. It was not a satisfactory visit.

Went to library. Drew out two books. American short stories & Life of Franklin to read.

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Mess call at six. Ate supper, washed out some clothes, then read awhile. Ralph E. and J. Bohi came along. They were going to the Y to weigh themselves. They urged me to go along. I went & was weighed at 155 1/2. I’m getting used to the grub and the climate. Back to barracks. Read awhile, then to bed about 10:40.

My Grandfather’s Words: Friday July 5, 1918

Weather: Hot. Fair.

Breakfast was meat loaf, bread, fried spuds, and juice. For dinner we had beans, tomatoes, water, bread, beef, and onions. For supper we had bread, water, and cornstarch pudding.

A usual day…up at 6, a cold shower & dressed by 6:30. Reveille & breakfast & work as usual. Two letters at noon. One from Mary Dear & one from Mother. Mary will have her tonsils taken out tomorrow at 1:10. I am worrying, more or less. Yet I know she is in God’s hand. He will take care of her. Mother & the boys are well. They expected to stay home on the 4th, but they may go to Marshall, she thought.

Ben never writes to me. I guess he does not care for my telling him of the Lord Jesus. I surely wish he were saved or that I could make him see his need of a Savior.

I don’t know much else to write tonight. Just finished a letter to Mary so will go to my bunk. 9:45 P.M.

"Have something to say and say it as clearly as you can. That is the only secret of style." (Matthew Arnold)

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