Tag Archives: WWI camps in Texas

My Grandfather’s Words: Monday July 22, 1918

It was cool this A.M., but when the sun was high it got hot.

Breakfast consisted of prunes, bread and coffee, and fried spuds. Dinner (lunch) was weiners and kraut, bread & water, and a nice pudding. For supper we had sheep meat stew, spuds, fried carrots, cocoa, & cake.

I got up at 6:15. Passed on my bath. I had to go to hospital at 10:00. I went on sick call to get my hospital order signed. When I went I discovered my glasses were not there. I will have to go back again tomorrow evening.

I had a letter from Mary Dear this morning. Mother is there in Waterloo. I didn’t know she was to be there yet. Mary doesn’t know what to do hardly. She thinks she should stay and look after Aunt Frances & she would like to come down here to be near me, too.

I worked on the hay gang this P.M. We unloaded hay from the train cars. We took three loads to the corrals,  thirty-five bales per load.

Our top sergeant read an order this evening at retreat relating to military courtesy & discipline. It stated there was to be a high official here from Washington & some English officers with him. They were to take some animals over for the British government. We were to be on our best behavior. I hope we don’t disappoint him.

Rumor is that the British officers are to take all the animals that are fit to go at this time. I hope they do. Chances are some of us will get a chance at a different job.

We had a dust storm this evening. It was so dusty & windy I couldn’t see the riding barn from where I was not far away. Finally got to my tent. Dust covered everything. I had a good bath. In bed by 10:00.

My Grandfather’s Words: Thursday July 18, 1918 and Friday July 19, 1918

Thursday

The weather was cool this morning and then again in toward evening, but hot in the middle of the afternoon.

For breakfast we had beef heart in sauce, fried spuds, and a banana. Lunch was sliced boiled ham and cabbage and pickles. For supper we had fried spuds, peas, bread and water, and watermelon.

It was the usual routine today: Up at 6:15, I had to hustle to get bathed and dressed for reveille. Had to repeat at the hospital this A.M. & was not attended to, had to return in the P.M. & then I must go again tomorrow. My eyes had been bothering me a great deal lately. They are smarting and feel as if there is sand in them. They are gummed up with matter in the mornings. At times my vision goes blank for a moment.

Friday

Weather is hot.

I hardly remember what I ate today. I was up at the usual time, bathed and dressed in time for reveille. After breakfast, I went to the hospital again. Yesterday, they used Homatropine in my eyes (made from atropine, which is extracted from belladonna, and used to dilate the eyes), and I couldn’t see to write. Today, I am wearing dark glasses until tomorrow. They have ordered me new glasses. I will report Monday to get them.

Just met with Sargent Knudson. He asked me what I was doing. I told him laying around until my eyes were better. He asked if I was reporting on sick call. I said no. He said I had better or I would get in trouble if anyone reported me.

—Writing this all on Saturday—